News & Announcements

Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part II

Posted: August 03, 2010

Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part II

This NNED Network in Action Forum call that took place on July 28, 2010 is the second of a two part series featuring efforts taking place in communities across the nation to celebrate Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month (to view the recording of Part I click here).  This call focused on the Asian American, African American, and LGBT communities.  Speakers provided both a national overview of the efforts taking place to enhance public awareness of mental illness and mental illness among minorities and focused on local efforts in New Jersey and California.  To learn what other communities are doing and see how you too can celebrate this important month, download presentation slides from the webinar below.

Presentation Slides:
Asian American Presentation
DJ Ida (1.6MB)
Kavoos Bassiri (7.0MB)

African American Presentation
Kathy Wright

LGBT Presentation
Caitlin Ryan

Speakers:
DJ Ida, Executive Director, NAAPIMHA

Dr. D.J. Ida has over thirty years experience working with the Asian American Pacific Islander communities and received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Colorado.  She has a long history of community organization and helped establish several organizations including the Asian Pacific Development Center, a specialty mental health clinic in Denver, the National Asian American, Pacific Islander Mental Health Association, NAAPIMHA, and the National Alliance of Multi-ethnic Behavioral Health Associations. 

Kavoos Bassiri, President and CEO, Richmond Area Multi-Services, Inc.
Kavoos G. Bassiri is President & CEO of Richmond Area Multi-Services, Inc. (RAMS), a private non-profit mental health agency in San Francisco.  He is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a Certified Group Psychotherapist with over two decades of clinical and administrative experience in the field of mental health. He is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UCSF School of Medicine and maintains a private psychotherapy & consultation practice.

Kathy Wright, Executive Director, New Jersey Parents' Caucus
Kathy Wright’s experience as an advocate, mental health professional, educator and marketing professional has spanned over two decades. Most recently, she has been instrumental in developing and implementing programs and supportive services that empower parents, caregivers and family members who are raising children with severe mental health challenges. She Executive Director of the New Jersey Parents' Caucus (NJPC) and is the developer of NJPC’s New Jersey Model of Parent Empowerment and Collaboration & Parents Empowerment Academy and remains dedicated to working with families to become self-sufficient, overcome the stigma placed on them by society and work with dignity as collaborative partners with professionals.

Caitlin Ryan, Project Director, Family Acceptance Project
Caitlin Ryan is the Director of the Family Acceptance Project.™ Caitlin is a clinical social worker who has worked on LGBT health and mental health since the 1970s, and AIDS since 1982. She received her clinical training with children and adolescents at Smith College School for Social Work in inpatient and community mental health programs, and began her social work career in school-based psychoeducational settings. Caitlin pioneered community-based AIDS services at the beginning of the epidemic; initiated the first major study to identify lesbian health needs in the early 1980s; and has worked to implement quality care for LGBT youth since the early 1990s. She developed the Family Acceptance Project™ with Rafael Diaz in 2002 to promote family support, decrease risk and improve well-being for LGBT youth.


** This webinar was offered in partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Multicultural Action Center, National Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, National Latino Behavioral Health Association, First Nations Behavioral Health Association, National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association, and the Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health. **

Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part II from Change Matrix LLC on Vimeo.



CDC Report Reveals Link Between HIV and Poverty (posted 8/2)

Posted: August 02, 2010

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a first-of-its-kind analysis showing that 2.1 percent of heterosexuals living in high-poverty urban areas in the United States are infected with HIV.  This analysis suggests that many low-income cities across the United States now have generalized HIV epidemics as defined by the United Nations Joint Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).  UNAIDS defines a generalized epidemic as one that is firmly established in the general population, with an overall HIV prevalence in the general population of more than 1 percent.  While subpopulations with higher risk (such as men who have sex with men and injection drug users) may still contribute disproportionately to the spread of HIV in these areas, heterosexual transmission is also sufficient to sustain an epidemic independent of those groups. For more information click here.

The analysis also shows that poverty is the single most important demographic factor associated with HIV infection among inner-city heterosexuals.  Contrary to severe racial disparities that characterize the overall U.S. epidemic, researchers found no differences in HIV prevalence by race/ethnicity in this population.  "This study reveals a powerful link between poverty and HIV risk, and a widespread HIV epidemic in America's inner cities," said Kevin Fenton, M.D., Ph.D., director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.  "In this country, HIV clearly strikes the economically disadvantaged in a devastating way."

"These findings have significant implications for how we think about HIV prevention.  We can't look at HIV in isolation from the environment in which people live," said Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC's Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.  "This analysis points to an urgent need to prioritize HIV prevention efforts in disadvantaged communities.  We are pleased that President Obama's new National HIV/AIDS Strategy reflects this type of approach, in terms of targeting HIV prevention resources to those in greatest need." There were no significant differences in HIV prevalence by race or ethnicity in these low income urban areas: prevalence was 2.1 percent among blacks, 2.1 percent among Hispanics, and 1.7 percent among whites.  By contrast, the U.S. epidemic overall is characterized by severe racial/ethnic disparities: the HIV prevalence rate for blacks is almost 8 times that of whites, and the HIV prevalence rate among Hispanics is nearly 3 times that of whites.  The absence of race-based differences in this analysis is likely due to existing high prevalence of HIV in poor urban areas, which – regardless of race or ethnicity – places individuals living in these areas at greater risk for exposure to HIV with each sexual encounter.  Authors note that other factors associated with poverty also likely contribute to high HIV prevalence in these settings.  Some of these factors include limited health care access, which can reduce utilization of HIV testing and prevention services; substance abuse, which can increase sexual risk behavior; and high rates of incarceration, which can disrupt the stability of relationships.



New Report on Gay and Transgender Homeless Youth (posted 8/2)

Posted: August 02, 2010

The Center for American Progress recently released a report focusing on the issue of gay and transgender homeless youth entitled "On the Streets: The Federal Response to Gay and Transgender Homeless Youth".  The report provides an overview of the issue of homelessness in the gay and transgender youth community in the context of homeless youth in general and provides a list of recommended actions that the federal government should take to address this issue.  The report places emphasis on the mental health risks for gay and transgender youth who are homeless and offers solutions for how to fix the failing safety net for these youth.  To download the full report click here.

Facts from the Report:

  • There are approximately 1.6 million to 2.8 million homeless young people in the United States, and estimates suggest that disproportionate numbers of those youth are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender.
  • 42 percent of gay homeless youth abuse alcohol compared to 27 percent of heterosexual youth.
  • Homeless gay and transgender youth also report higher rates of unprotected sex than heterosexual homeless youth,16 as well as higher rates of HIV infection than heterosexual youth.
  • 44 percent of homeless gay youth reported being approached to engage in sex in order to meet their basic needs.
  • Sixty-two percent of gay and transgender home- less youth attempt suicide compared to 29 percent of their heterosexual homeless peers.

For more statistics on gay and transgender youth homelessness click here.



Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part I

Posted: July 27, 2010

Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part I

This NNED Network in Action Forum call that took place on July 7, 2010 features efforts taking place in the Latino and American Indian/Alaska Native communities to celebrate Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.  Speakers provided both a national overview of the efforts taking place to enhance public awareness of mental illness and mental illness among minorities and focused on two local efforts in San Francisco, California and Portland, Oregon. To learn what other communities are doing and see how you too can celebrate this important month watch this recording of Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities, click here or scroll to the bottom of the page.

PowerPoints Slides:

Panel 1, Latino Community:
Fred Sandoval

Estela Garcia

Sal Nunez

Panel 2, American Indian/Alaska Native Community:
Seprieono Locario

Stephanie Craig


Q & A:

To download the answers to the questions from attendees who weren't able to ask their questions during the webinar, click here.
 

Speakers:
Fred Sandoval, Chair, National Latino Behavioral Health Association
Fred is Director for the New Mexico State Income Support Division and currently serves as the New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative Lead on Cultural and Linguistic Competency and Consumer, Youth and Family Involvement. He is the current President of the National Latino Behavioral Health Association in Washington, DC and former NAMI National First Vice President in Arlington, Virginia. He has provided leadership on a wide range of Latino behavioral health initiatives. Fred received his Masters in Public Administration from Northern Arizona University and his Bachelors in University Studies from the University of New Mexico.

Estela Garcia, Executive Director, Instituto Familiar de la Raza
Dr. Estela Garcia is a licensed clinical psychologist with 25 years experience in the behavioral health field. She has expertise in developing cultural competent behavioral health and social services and has promoted integration of traditional, complimentary and conventional methodologies in service provision throughout her career. She is the Executive Director of Instituto Familiar De La Raza and represents the agency in collaborative and healthcare initiatives to ensure that native born and immigrant Latinos, including the indigenous populations of San Francisco, have access to culturally and linguistically competent healthcare services.

Sal Nunez, Instituto Familiar de la Raza
Dr. Sal Núñez practices as an educator, researcher, consultant and clinician in the San Francisco Bay Area.  He is a tenured faculty member at City College of San Francisco, serves as a consultant, provider, and clinical supervisor at Instituto Familiar De La Raza, and maintains a private practice. Over the course of a decade, Dr. Núñez developed a therapeutic drumming approach that integrates ceremony, drumming, indigenous and behavioral medicine, and psychological principles. In 2004 Dr. Núñez founded the Healthy Drumming Institute® and several years ago began training clinicians, community service providers, and youth in traditional healing arts. Dr. Nunez offers therapeutic drumming circles at Instituto Familiar De La Raza, City College of San Francisco, and other San Francisco Bay Area locations.

Seprieono Locario, National Indian Health Board

Mr. Seprieono Locario (Navajo/Sicilian) earned a B.A. in Public Administration and from San Diego State University in 1999 and an M.A. in Counseling Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology in 2001. Mr. Locario has dedicated 15 years of professional development to work with American Indian youth throughout the state of California, within multiple levels of incarceration, in community mental health centers, higher education institutions, and reservation communities. Mr. Locario currently works as a Behavioral Health Program Coordinator for the National Indian Health Board in Washington, D.C. where he focuses on identifying and developing best practices with tribal communities and assisting in the support of education for and with AI/AN health.

Stephanie Craig, Project Director Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board

Stephanie Craig Rushing, PhD, MPH, is a Project Director at the NW Tribal Epidemiology Center, a tribal health promotion, surveillance, and research center affiliated with the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board. Dr. Rushing directs the Board’s Meth and Suicide Prevention Initiative, Project Red Talon (a STD/HIV prevention project), and several other adolescent health projects. She completed her Ph.D. in Public Administration and Policy at the Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University, focusing on Community Health and Social Change, and her Masters of Public Health at Boston University.


** This webinar is offered in partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Multicultural Action Center, National Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health, National Latino Behavioral Health Association, First Nations Behavioral Health Association, National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association, and the Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health. **

Celebrating Mental Health in Diverse Communities Part I from Rachele Espiritu on Vimeo.



Multicultural PSA Campaigns Win International Innovation Award (posted 7/22)

Posted: July 21, 2010

Global Accelerator Award badge

The Global Accelerator Award™ has been awarded to the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in collaboration with the Ad Council and the National Network to Eliminate Disparities (NNED), for culturally targeted public service announcements (PSAs) across the United States to “promote recovery from mental health problems within multicultural communities by educating and inspiring young adults to talk openly about issues of mental health.” The PSAs are part of a major multicultural outreach campaign for Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Chinese American, and African American communities during National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Congratulations to SAMHSA, the Ad Council and the NNED Multicultural Steering Committee!

Winners of the Global Accelerator Award are organizations or people who have helped propel into action an idea that holds the promise of dramatically improving patient care and human health throughout the world. The Accelerator Award is based on an Innovation Cell methodology that analyzes which organizations or people have put an idea or strategy into action that has generated significant positive “buzz” or “chatter” on the World Wide Web – notably, on patient-led blogs and social networking sites. The Global Accelerator Award is powered by the Health Strategy Innovation Cell based at Massey College at the University of Toronto. The Innovation Cell specializes in capturing real-time global healthcare intelligence – to understand the needs, wants and preferences of patients and caregivers around the world through their website My Health Innovation. The Cell works to listen to people online and help launch their health ideas into action.



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